miércoles, 10 de julio de 2013

TREC: The Next Generation



The international research network “Translation Research Empiricism Cognition” (TREC) convened in Barcelona for a regular meeting on July 4-5 2013. This time we also held a previous seminar on empirical and experimental research in  translation, where PhD students presented their ongoing work. These are, in alphabetical order, some of the stars of TREC’s next generation:
 
José Jorge Amigo Extremera (PETRA, ULPGC) talked about “Fitting culture into Translation Process Research”, where he summarized his project to develop operationalizations of culture and knowledge for empirical and experimental research, drawing form social and situated cognition approaches.

Mariceli Aquino (LETRA, UFMG) presented “A relevance-theoretic study of processing effort in post-editing tasks: an analysis of German modal particles  “. She will be using Translog and Tobii T60 to study post-editions of the MT output of text excerpts from a corpus of articles from Deutsche Welle.

Claudine Borg (Aston University) is working on an in-depth case study of post-drafting self-revision of the translation a novel from French into Maltese through think-aloud, translator observation, interviews, analysis of drafts and ST-TT comparison drawing on corpus-based techniques.

Luis Miguel Castillo (PACTE, UAB) contributed with “Acceptability and the acquisition of translation competence: preliminary results”, where he described his goal of tracing the evolution of translation quality throughout the process of the acquisition of translation competence.

Norma Fonseca (LETRA, UFMG) draws from Krings (2001) to distinguish temporal, technical and cognitive aspects of effortful processing during task execution and builds on Alves & Gonçalves (2013) to study cognitive effort during monolingual post-editing processes using key logging, screen recordings, and guided written protocols.

Andrea Hunziker Heeb (ZHAW) struck a vital chord by focusing on ethical issues that may arise with professional translators as research participants. She used a general academic self-evaluation checklist and a code of good practice in research to frame her presentation, which fostered a lively discussion.

Hurtado, Amigo, Mellinger & Jakobsen. TREC 2013Andrea Hunziker Heeb and Annina Meyer (ZHAW) presented the design, the methods and the hypotheses of a research project focused on ergonomic issues associated with software settings, equipment, and/or physical conditions that might impede the  efficiency of translation by slowing down decision-making and other cognitive processes during translation.

Arlene Koglin (LETRA, UFMG)  presented her project “Processing effort and cognitive effects trade-off in metaphor post-editing.“ Arlene is using eye tracking, key logging and retrospective protocols to gather data, and Relevance Theory as a referential framework.

Minna Kumpulainen (University of Eastern Finland) presented an overview of the use of pauses as potential cognitive indicators in translation process research, where she centered on pause length and their correlation with process segment boundaries.

Gisela Massana Roselló (PACTE, UAB) presented the design and some methodological issues of her research project on the acquisition of translation competence in trainees who have Portuguese as their second foreign language. Language typological proximity between Portuguese and Spanish is a major concern in this project.

Christopher Mellinger (KETRA, Kent State University) is well advanced in his PhD research  project on how cognitive effort is distributed during the translation task, which he is analyzing through the pause contour of  applied cognitive effort when using a translation memory to translate. He presented some preliminary findings on how the use of TMs and specific fuzzy match features affect the translation process in Spanish-to-English translation professionals with 4–7 years of experience.

Ana Muñoz Miquel (GENTT, UJI) presented her ongoing work on medical translator’s profiles, where she combines the cognitive notion of translators’ competence with a sociological survey of medical translators self-image and a pedagogical perspective on the needs of medical translator trainees.

Christian Olalla Soler (PACTE, UAB)  will be using screen recording, translations and questionanaires to study the acquisition of translators’ cultural  competence by Spanish trainee students with German as their second foregin language, from the perspective of PACTE’s (2003) translation competence model.

Raphael Sannholm (Stockholm University) presented the results of his MA thesis, which checked whether  different text types give rise to different foci in the cognitive processes during translation within a fairly homogenous group of participants, and also outlined his future PhD project on on automaticity in the cognitive processes in translation.

Karina Szpak’s (LETRA, UFMG) research project applies the relevance-theoretical concepts of conceptually and procedurally encoded information to study eye fixations, time spent, and attention units to identify instances of processing effort in translation.